Archive for the ‘What Others Say’ Category

NIMBY no more. Silent majority has spoken. ‘Yes, in my backyard’

NIMBY no more. Silent majority has spoken. A month ago a group of 130 Mountbatten residents had petitioned for a rehabilitation centres for the elderly to be located elsewhere

Today, a GROUP of 500 residents in Mountbatten are fighting back against their neighbours’ opposition. Kudos.

DOING IT FOR OLD FOLK
“The old folks here are unable to speak for themselves and the estate, so somebody has got to do something.” — Retired businessman Michael Tan, 72, who with a few friends in the neighbourhood began to gather support for the pro-centre petition

‘Yes, in my backyard’
Published on Jun 2, 2012, The Straits Times.  By Robin Chan

Group of 500 residents want Govt to stick to plans to build rehab centres

A GROUP of 500 residents in Mountbatten are fighting back against their neighbours’ opposition to plans for rehabilitation centres for the elderly to be built in their estate.

In what appears to be a twist to the not-in-my-backyard (Nimby) syndrome, they have petitioned the Government to stick with its plans to build the centres in the void decks of Blocks 10 and 11 on Jalan Batu.

Made up mostly of elderly folk, the group includes residents who live in these two blocks. Their petition comes about a month after a group of 130 residents had petitioned for the facilities to be located elsewhere.

The second group made their move fearing that the authorities would drop the plans or build a centre over a communal fountain – as the first group had suggested – where many like to gather.

Some of them were also frustrated by the first petition, and believe it came from younger neighbours who did not want their void deck to be used, even though it would take up only about 30 per cent of the space.

‘The younger ones don’t understand,’ said contractor A. Samat, 68, who lives in Block 10. ‘It seems that some younger residents nowadays can only think of themselves.’

Housewife Gurdip Kaur, 55, whose son has been going to a temporary rehabilitation centre at Block 12 after being injured in a car accident, agreed. ‘There are more old folk here than children,’ she told The Straits Times. ‘If the Government is doing something nice for us, we should let them.’

If built, the new centres will be about nine times the size of the temporary one, and have equipment to aid recovery from stroke or Parkinson’s disease.

The neighbourhood rift had started last month, when about 130 residents who live in Blocks 10 and 11 submitted a petition to Mountbatten MP Lim Biow Chuan. Their concerns included the safety of children playing at the void decks, construction noise, and the likelihood of the resale price of their flats dropping.

They then proposed alternative venues for the centres: a nearby waste-bin collection centre, a central fountain next to Block 10, or the void deck of Block 1 or 14.

But the ceilings at Blocks 1 and 14 are believed to be too low to accommodate the centres, while the fountain is a popular gathering place for residents. The other blocks do not have void decks.

The petition not only fuelled national debate over the Nimby syndrome, but also angered other Jalan Batu residents who wanted the centres built in the void decks.

Hearing their concerns, retired businessman Michael Tan and a few friends in the neighbourhood began to gather support for the pro-centre petition. Said the 72-year-old, who has lived there for 16 years: ‘The old folks here are unable to speak for themselves and the estate, so somebody has got to do something.’

The signatories include residents of Blocks 10 and 11, but it is not known how many of them live in these two blocks.

Mr Lim, their MP, has submitted both petitions to the Ministry of Health, which he said is still reviewing the case. He said the Government would take into account the views of the ‘silent majority’ as well.

For older residents like Madam Teh Kar Gim, 84, the greatest fear is that the fountain gets removed.

Said her neighbour Madam Kong Mei Lan, 74: ‘It is such a nice place. Why would they want to build a centre right over that?’

chanckr@sph.com.sg

Photo: LIKE & SHARE: NIMBY no more. Silent majority has spoken. A month ago a group of 130 Mountbatten residents had petitioned for a rehabilitation centres for the elderly to be located elsewhere.<br /> Today, a GROUP of 500 residents in Mountbatten are fighting back against their neighbours' opposition. Kudos.</p> <p>DOING IT FOR OLD FOLK<br /> "The old folks here are unable to speak for themselves and the estate, so somebody has got to do something." -- Retired businessman Michael Tan, 72, who with a few friends in the neighbourhood began to gather support for the pro-centre petition</p> <p>'Yes, in my backyard'<br /> Group of 500 residents want Govt to stick to plans to build rehab centres<br /> Published on Jun 2, 2012, The Straits Times.</p> <p>By Robin Chan<br /> A GROUP of 500 residents in Mountbatten are fighting back against their neighbours' opposition to plans for rehabilitation centres for the elderly to be built in their estate.</p> <p>In what appears to be a twist to the not-in-my-backyard (Nimby) syndrome, they have petitioned the Government to stick with its plans to build the centres in the void decks of Blocks 10 and 11 on Jalan Batu.</p> <p>Made up mostly of elderly folk, the group includes residents who live in these two blocks. Their petition comes about a month after a group of 130 residents had petitioned for the facilities to be located elsewhere.</p> <p>The second group made their move fearing that the authorities would drop the plans or build a centre over a communal fountain - as the first group had suggested - where many like to gather.</p> <p>Some of them were also frustrated by the first petition, and believe it came from younger neighbours who did not want their void deck to be used, even though it would take up only about 30 per cent of the space.</p> <p>'The younger ones don't understand,' said contractor A. Samat, 68, who lives in Block 10. 'It seems that some younger residents nowadays can only think of themselves.'</p> <p>Housewife Gurdip Kaur, 55, whose son has been going to a temporary rehabilitation centre at Block 12 after being injured in a car accident, agreed. 'There are more old folk here than children,' she told The Straits Times. 'If the Government is doing something nice for us, we should let them.'</p> <p>If built, the new centres will be about nine times the size of the temporary one, and have equipment to aid recovery from stroke or Parkinson's disease.</p> <p>The neighbourhood rift had started last month, when about 130 residents who live in Blocks 10 and 11 submitted a petition to Mountbatten MP Lim Biow Chuan. Their concerns included the safety of children playing at the void decks, construction noise, and the likelihood of the resale price of their flats dropping.</p> <p>They then proposed alternative venues for the centres: a nearby waste-bin collection centre, a central fountain next to Block 10, or the void deck of Block 1 or 14.</p> <p>But the ceilings at Blocks 1 and 14 are believed to be too low to accommodate the centres, while the fountain is a popular gathering place for residents. The other blocks do not have void decks.</p> <p>The petition not only fuelled national debate over the Nimby syndrome, but also angered other Jalan Batu residents who wanted the centres built in the void decks.</p> <p>Hearing their concerns, retired businessman Michael Tan and a few friends in the neighbourhood began to gather support for the pro-centre petition. Said the 72-year-old, who has lived there for 16 years: 'The old folks here are unable to speak for themselves and the estate, so somebody has got to do something.'</p> <p>The signatories include residents of Blocks 10 and 11, but it is not known how many of them live in these two blocks.</p> <p>Mr Lim, their MP, has submitted both petitions to the Ministry of Health, which he said is still reviewing the case. He said the Government would take into account the views of the 'silent majority' as well.</p> <p>For older residents like Madam Teh Kar Gim, 84, the greatest fear is that the fountain gets removed.</p> <p>Said her neighbour Madam Kong Mei Lan, 74: 'It is such a nice place. Why would they want to build a centre right over that?'</p> <p>chanckr@sph.com.sg

repost from Fabrications About The PAP

*Update*

  Lim Bc

Lim BC commented in the FabPAP post:

Dear all, I have stated in the ST that not all residents who are against the physiotherapy centre should be classified as “NIMBY”. Many of them do have valid concerns. I have asked MOH to look into their concerns and MOH will do their best to ensure that as they will do as much as they can to allay these concerns.

These people who oppose the centre are also my residents and I will do what I can to assist them. I will also do my best to ensure that whatever is eventually built in this area is of benefit to the majority of the residents.

Currently, the assessment by MOH is that a physiotherapy rehabilitation centre is of greater need in this estate due to the large number of elderly living in the area. The centre is by referral only and there will not be any walk in clients. Traffic congestion would not be an issue. Priority will be given to the residents living in the estate.

The plan is also to have a nursing station where nurses will make home visits to teach residents how to clean their wounds. There will be 3 full time physiotherapists located at the centre and a geriatric doctor who will make regular visits. It will be of great benefit to all the residents in Tg Rhu.

A Bit of Advice…

Health:
1. Drink plenty of water.
2. Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a beggar.
3. Eat more foods that grow on trees and plants and eat less food that is manufactured in plants.
4. Live with the 3 E’s – Energy, Enthusiasm and Empathy
5. Play more games.
6. Read more books than you did in 2009.
7. Sit in silence for at least 10 minutes each day.
8. Sleep for 7 hours.
9. Take a 10-30 minutes walk daily. And while you walk, smile.

Personality:
10. Don’t compare your life to others. You have no idea what their journey is all about.
11. Don’t have negative thoughts or things you cannot control. Instead invest your energy in the positive present moment.
12. Don’t over do. Keep your limits.
13. Don’t take yourself so seriously. No one else does.
14. Don’t waste your precious energy on gossip.
15. Dream more while you are awake.
16. Envy is a waste of time. You already have all you need.
17. Forget issues of the past. Don’t remind your partner with his/her mistakes of the past. That will ruin your present happiness.
18. Life is too short to waste time hating anyone. Don’t hate others.
19. Make peace with your past so it won’t spoil the present.
20. No one is in charge of your happiness except you.
21. Realize that life is a school and you are here to learn. Problems are simply part of the curriculum that appear and fade away like algebra class but the lessons you learn will last a lifetime.
22. Smile and laugh more.
23. You don’t have to win every argument. Agree to disagree.

Society:
24. Call your family often.
25. Each day give something good to others.
26. Forgive everyone for everything.
27. Spend time with people over the age of 70 & under the age of 6.
28. Try to make at least three people smile each day.
29. What other people think of you is none of your business.
30. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick. Your friends will. Stay in touch.

Life:
31. Do the right thing!
32. Get rid of anything that isn’t useful, beautiful or joyful.
33. However good or bad a situation is, it will change.
34. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.
35. The best is yet to come.
36. Your Inner most is always happy. So, be happy.”

– Anonymous

Pre-U Seminar Reflection : To the Blogger of fifthazure (who criticized DPM Teo Chee Hean) : Outright Rude, Mindless and 没家教

Euro 2012: StarHub 3 mio TV 0

Euro 2012: StarHub 3 mio TV 0

All the goals were scored during the warm up. (They were all own goals.)

“Those catching the [Euro 2012] matches through our platform can be assured that our network is established and proven (unlike mio TV which always freezes when it feels like it), and they will be the first to know whenever a goal is scored (unlike those suckers watching on mio TV).” — Iris Wee, VP of StarHub

What StarHub wanted to say (but couldn’t).

*News*  : StarHub pledges smooth transmission

by  I Cannot Take It

Ken Teh on North Korea

Ken Teh

Ken Teh

Video Linkhttp://info.channelnewsasia.com/videoplayer/cnaplayer/videoplayer1.php?playerName=specialreport&skin=amliveplayer.swf&bgskin=amlivebackground.swf&filename=amlive_0531_interview1.flv&videoTitle=amlive%20Interview%20Ken%20Teh%20&&adfilebefore=cna%20video2.flv&adfileafter=&playmode=S&playerType=5

A nation that captured the imagination of the world, not for its political might, instead, for its controversial rocket launches and nuclear tests frowned upon by the super-powers.

Catch a rare glimpse behind the closed doors of Pyongyang, with Channel News Asia’s Ken Teh.

Source : Ken Teh on North Korea

Sincere thanks from a low-income family

MCYS Singapore

It is very encouraging and uplifting for us to read this letter. We applaud our colleagues who have patiently and passionately helped Ms Janice Chia and other families in need. 🙂

***************************************************************************************
Sincere thanks from a low-income family
I wish to thank our Government and North East Community Development Council (CDC) for all the help schemes for low-income families like mine.

My husband is out of the country for the next few years and, having been a stay-at-home mother for three years, it took me a few months to look for a job. Yet, I did not feel pressurised to quickly find one, as the CDC understood our situation and granted us almost S$800 a month in that time for our daily expenses.At KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, where I seek counselling, I get full subsidy. This helps working mums like me to cope with stress, as I have young children who need attention.

At the National University Hospital, where my son receives therapy, we pay only 20 per cent (less than S$10) for each session. When his therapist said he needed a bicycle to train his motor skills, the CDC was very understanding and bought one for him.

The CDC also approved a childcare subsidy of about S$4,000 over the past six months. I can work in peace, knowing my kids are in full-day childcare.

Having spent almost a year in another country where the low-income are left hungry and most taxes are lost to corruption, I am proud Singapore is trying its best to do the right thing.

From Janice Chia Chor Khoon,
May 30, 2012, Todayonline

Worker Party can do no wrong one.

WP can do no wrong one. Cannot say bad thing about WP. Point out it’s mistake only you will be branded bias and a “political tool” of PAP. Must only sing praises of WP hor.

So NMP, Prof Eugene Tan, you really bias lor to say such thing about WP. :

Excerpts : 

The WP would also have to demonstrate that it does not seek special treatment and condone in what I call banal acts of lawlessness.

For instance, the WP did not end its by-election rallies on time and overran by 10-15 minutes.

It would be extremely challenging for the police to intervene to ensure that the rules governing the issue of the rally permits are observed.

Further, in launching a stinging attack on the mainstream media for being a “political tool” of the PAP’s election campaign, the WP did not adequately substantiate its case.

Not only was this an attempt to capitalise on the by-election victory to make political points, the WP was also effectively asking the media for nothing but favourable coverage of its party and its candidates.

As the WP feels hard-done enough to promptly raise these matters after the election results were announced on Saturday, the WP should follow through and raise these and other important issues in Parliament.

Given that Mr Low has urged Singaporeans to develop a “First World Society”, his party must demonstrate that it treats Singaporeans in similar fashion. And voters must demand from the WP the very same standards it requires of the PAP.

Fabrications About The PAP says

************************************************************************************

Both sides will need to raise their game

by Eugene K B Tan , May 29, 2012, Todayonline 

Now that the Hougang by-election is over, the Workers’ Party (WP) and the People’s Action Party (PAP) will conduct their post-mortems.

Among the key questions would be how they campaigned and how they can deal with the issues that the hustings threw up.

For the WP, how can it keep Hougang in its fold and grow the famed “Hougang Spirit”?

How can it be less reliant on its charismatic leader Low Thia Khiang?

For the PAP, how can it make significant gains and be more competitive in Hougang?

VIBRANT POLITICAL SYSTEM

The PAP was not expected to win in Hougang, a WP stronghold since 1991.

The WP victory last Saturday, despite a nearly 3-percentage-point drop in support when compared with the May 2011 General Election (GE), is nonetheless a continuing and strong endorsement of the WP.

The WP’s national-issues approach as well as its “Towards a First World Parliament” battle cry resonated well with the voters.

The WP read the ground sentiments well and connected with the desire among Singaporeans for a more open, competitive and vibrant political system.

Ironically, this aspiration is tied to the ruling party’s emphasis on good governance. Coupled with a nascent growing political consciousness, Singaporeans have internalised that good governance requires more than just performance legitimacy.

A one-party dominant system, while facilitating effective and decisive government, is also perceived to be inherently fragile since the likelihood of a systemic collapse is greater should the dominant party become inept, corrupt or insensitive.

As the WP’s political stock rises, it will also have to deal with the reality that there will be political ambitions and dreams to attend to within its own ranks. These “growing pains” are inevitable, and internal contestation and dissent will have to be managed.

SHOWCASING ITS STAND

With six elected Members of Parliament (MPs) and two Non-Constituency MPs, the WP must endeavour to make the best use of the parliamentary platform to showcase what it stands for and demonstrate how it can grow beyond being a check and balance.

As such, it is not enough to merely ask pointed questions of the Government. Increasingly, it should move motions in Parliament and demonstrate its ability to dissect government policies.

More than that, it needs to demonstrate that it can also propose viable policy alternatives.

This is a tall order, notwithstanding that it does not have the backup of a bureaucracy. But the WP cannot have its cake and eat it.

The great value proposition in providing alternative ideas is that it demonstrates that the realm of policy options is not confined to, and should not be defined solely by, one party’s world view. It will also engender healthy debate and result in more robust policymaking and implementation.

MAKING POLITICAL POINTS

The WP would also have to demonstrate that it does not seek special treatment and condone in what I call banal acts of lawlessness.

For instance, the WP did not end its by-election rallies on time and overran by 10-15 minutes.

It would be extremely challenging for the police to intervene to ensure that the rules governing the issue of the rally permits are observed.

Further, in launching a stinging attack on the mainstream media for being a “political tool” of the PAP’s election campaign, the WP did not adequately substantiate its case.

Not only was this an attempt to capitalise on the by-election victory to make political points, the WP was also effectively asking the media for nothing but favourable coverage of its party and its candidates.

As the WP feels hard-done enough to promptly raise these matters after the election results were announced on Saturday, the WP should follow through and raise these and other important issues in Parliament.

Given that Mr Low has urged Singaporeans to develop a “First World Society”, his party must demonstrate that it treats Singaporeans in similar fashion. And voters must demand from the WP the very same standards it requires of the PAP.

SENSE OF UNFAIRNESS

For the PAP, it needs to radically relook its approach to Hougang.

In particular, the PAP government needs to address the deeply-felt sense of unfairness in some of its policies, such as estate upgrading and the electoral system.

The upgrading incentive, in its various guises ranging from being an explicit electoral threat to carrot to a subtle promise of change, has not worked at all.

Instead, it offends the sense of fairness and equity, and this has worked to the detriment of the PAP.

Similarly, there is also the need to rethink the current policy of not appointing Opposition MPs as the advisers to the grassroots organisations (GROs) of their constituencies.

The justifications proffered by the People’s Association are unpersuasive, and undermine the good work done by the GROs.

As it stands, the GROs’ adviser in an Opposition ward needs to endorse the upgrading plans prepared by the Opposition town council.

The current arrangement results in the PAP being accused of punishing Opposition wards through denying them estate rejuvenation.

Let the Opposition MPs be fully in charge. They will then be held responsible and will have to measure up to voters’ expectations.

BETTER POLICYMAKING

Where the electoral system is concerned, a source of unhappiness relates to how electoral boundaries are drawn. The electoral boundaries are often redrawn without adequate explanation.

A maturing electorate will not accept such acts of fait accompli.

The “new normal” has become a powerful meme in local political discourse. But it must result in the PAP and the Opposition alike raising their game, resulting in better policymaking, a more engaged and committed citizenry and enhanced social cohesion.

What the PAP and the Opposition do between now and the next GE will provide a firmer indication of the direction and substance of political change in Singapore.

The next GE, which will have to be held by January 2017, might well be the real watershed election.

Link : Both sides will need to raise their game

%d bloggers like this: